Proactive choices are significant—with each one you’re making an intentional commitment to do something that matters to you.

You’re either moving toward something you’re drawn to achieving or having, or moving away from something you don’t want.

With each proactive choice, your aim is to stay conscious, alert and committed to the actions you take that support your choice to move forward. Using a map as a guide encourages you to assess what could undermine your efforts so you can plot your actions and responses accordingly.

Intentional, proactive choices typically fall into three categories:

  1. For professional choices you’re determining whether to start or leave a job, step out on your own or improve your current situation.

     

  2. In relationship choices you’re focusing on whether to begin a new relationship, work on mending one you’re already in, or end one that is no longer fulfilling.

     

  3. Your personal choices involve bringing something into your life that matters or removing something that doesn’t.

The specific choices to make within each category are vast and at any given time you may be managing multiple choices across these categories. You may be choosing to start a new job while concurrently ending a personal relationship while choosing to begin a morning meditation practice. You may be choosing to work with a new therapist while choosing to begin dating while also choosing to give greater attention to your self-care. 

In the course of your career journey, you’ll likely encounter one or more of the following professional choices:

  • Will you leave your current job or embark upon a new career? 
  • Will you take time off or venture out on your own? 
  • Will you dedicate greater effort to what you’re currently doing?

As you make relationship choices you’re focusing on whether to begin a new relationship, work on mending, supporting or building one you’re already in, or end one that is no longer fulfilling. 

Relationship choices are often highly charged and it can often feel as though the weight of your future rests on the decision to stay or go.

  • Will you choose to work on a relationship you’re already in and address its challenges? 
  • Will you choose to stay with intention or let the relationship wane? 
  • Will you choose to end a relationship that no longer meets your needs? 
  • Will you embark upon a new relationship? 
  • Will you reconnect to someone who’s mattered to you? 

Your personal choices involve bringing something into your life that matters, or letting go of something that doesn’t. You may choose to move, embrace a new opportunity, write a book or cultivate more joy in your life. As you seek growth and development, you may want to heal from past wounds and work with a coach or therapist. 

Making a personal choice is a powerful springboard to orient your life in a direction that has meaning—to step into what you trust is in your best interest and remain faithful and confident that you’re moving toward something that’s right for you. 

You may be choosing to say yes or no to an opportunity. You may be choosing to do something that supports your personal growth—asking for what you want, taking a stand for yourself or taking a deeper look at what triggers you. You may be choosing to shift your attitude to feel more gratitude, more joy, more openness. 

Personal choices of all sizes and complexities are a chance to affirm what matters.

Here are some broad examples of personal choices:

  • Choosing to make an uncomfortable choice
  • Choosing to let go of a bad habit
  • Choosing to make a loving choice
  • Choosing to bring joy into your life
  • Choosing to do something that scares you
  • Choosing to learn something new
  • Choosing to focus on your self-care.
  • Choosing to teach something
  • Choosing to let go of something that no longer serves you.

Any Questions?

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